Chemistry, Biotechnology, and Chemical Engineering (Chemical Engineering)

Associate professor

Takei, Takayuki

Development of transplantable organs in vivo

Development of blood capillary network in vitro

Organ transplantation has become an essential treatment modality in saving and prolonging lives. The major sources of organs are deceased donors after brain death. If you can create organs artificially in vitro, all patients awaiting transplantation can have an organ transplant.
Cells can survive in organs because capillary blood vessels supply them with sufficient oxygen and nutrients. This shows that development of a blood capillary network is essential for creating organs in vitro. Our research group has focused on such blood capillary networks in vitro.

Artificial blood capillary network fabricated by our group

Development of hydrogels with low toxicity

Hydrogel prepared by freeze-thawing polymer solution

For creating organs in vitro, the proliferation of cells between capillary blood vessels is also important. Hydrogel is a suitable material for cell proliferation due to its flexibility.
Many conventional hydrogels include toxic chemicals. The toxic chemicals prevent cell proliferation in the hydrogels. Our research group has focused on development of hydrogels with low toxicity.

Profile

Chemistry, Biotechnology, and Chemical Engineering (Chemical Engineering)

Associate professor

Takei, Takayuki

April 2012-Present: Associate Professor, Kagoshima University, Japan
April 2008-March 2012: Assistant Professor, Kyushu University, Japan
August 2007-March 2008: Research Associate, Kagoshima University, Japan
April 2007-July 2007: JSPS (Japan Society for the Promotion Science) Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Kagoshima University, Japan
March 2007: Ph.D. (Doctor of Engineering), Kyushu University, Japan

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